Funeral Arrangements Resources

Funeral Arrangements Resources | Internet Sites and Further Reading

ORGANIZATIONS

Cremation Association of North America (CANA)
401 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
(312) 644-6610
http://www.cremationassociation.org/html/for_consumers.html
The “Consumer” section of this website provides brochures answering the most commonly asked questions about cremation as a memorial option.

Funeral and Memorial Societies of America (FAMSA)
P.O. Box 10
Hinesburg, VT. 05461
(800) 458-5563
(802) 482-3437
FAMSA monitors the funeral industry for consumers and is dedicated to a consumer’s right to choose a meaningful, dignified, affordable funeral. Lobbies to reduce unjustifiable costs of burial and other funeral services. Provides extensive information about veteran’s funeral and burial benefits, organ and body donation and cremation.

International Cemetery and Funeral Association (ICFA)
1895 Preston White Drive
Reston, VA. 20191
(800) 645-7770
(703) 391-8400
http://icfa.org
Presents straight answers to real questions about funerals, cemeteries, cremation, grief and other issues related to the end of life. Dedicated to the belief that no family should have to face the loss of a loved one uninformed and unprepared.

Jewish Funeral Directors of America (JFDA)
150 Lynway, Suite 506
Lynn, MA. 01902
(781) 477-9300
http://www.jfda.org
The JFDA was organized in 1932 and since that time has been assisting people of the Jewish faith arrange meaningful and affordable funerals in the Jewish tradition. Within the Jewish community, the JFDA works closely with the Conservative, Reform, and Orthodox religious movements. Users can search the site for a funeral home in their state. Guides on the site include Jewish funeral information and Jewish funeral etiquette.

Monument Builders of North America (MBNA)
3158 S. River Rd., Suite 224
Des Plaines, IL. 60173
(800) 827-1000
(847) 803-8800
http://www.monumentbuilders.org
MBNA members are actively engaged in the design, production, installation and maintenance of monuments/memorials, both personal and civic. While maintaining a broad range of programs and services for its members, MBNA also actively encourages public interest, knowledge, and appreciation of the art of memorialization. Their website contains information on purchasing a monument and presents examples of creative and unique memorials.

National Funeral Directors Association (NFDA)
13625 Bishop’s Drive
Brookfield, WI 53005
(800) 228-6332
(262) 789-1880
http://nfda.org
The mission of NFDA is to enhance the funeral service profession and promote quality service to the consumer. The “Consumer Resources” page of their website features links providing extensive information on funeral costs, state funeral director associations, and funeral service organizations.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
National Cemetery Administration
810 Vermont Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20420
800-827-1000
The National Cemetery Administration (NCA) honors Veterans with a final resting place and lasting memorials that commemorate their service to our nation. Maintains national cemeteries and provides a headstone or marker and Presidential Memorial Certificates in recognition of veterans service to a their nation.

HOTLINES AND TOLL FREE NUMBERS

AARP’s Product Report on Funerals and Burials: Goods and Services
For a free copy of the report You can call AARP at (800) 424-2277 to obtain a copy. This product report offers more information on these topics. It can be a resource when you prearrange a funeral and burial (whether or not you prepay) or when you make arrangements at the time of death for someone.

Federal Trade Commission
Consumer Response Center
Washington, D.C. 20580
(877) FTC-HELP
https://rn.ftc.gov/pls/dod/wsolcq$.startup?Z_ORG_CODE=PU01
Contact the Federal Trade Commission to file a complaint against a funeral home.

Funeral Service Consumer Assistance Program (FSCAP)
P.O. Box 486
Elm Grove, WI. 53122-0486
(800) 662-7666
(708) 827-6337
FSCAP is a nonprofit consumer service designed to help people understand funeral service and related topics and to help them resolve funeral service concerns. FSCAP service representatives offer consumers recommendations to steer them in the right direction and to the right resources to identify needs, address complaints, and resolve problems.

INTERNET SITES AND WEB RESOURCES

Federal Trade Commission Consumer Response Center presents useful information on making funeral and burial arrangements. http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/services/funeral.htm

Funeralnet is a comprehensive online resource for obituary, funeral, cremation and cemetery information. Has a section on bereavement travel. http://www.funeralnet.com/info_guide/index.html

University of Florida College of Medicine Anatomical Board’s website provides a state-by-state directory of medical schools that accept organ donations. http://www.med.ufl.edu/anatbd/usprograms.html

SUGGESTED READING

Carlson, Lisa. Caring for the Dead: Your Final Act of Love. Upper Access Book Publishers. 1998. This is a comprehensive guide for consumers making funeral arrangements with or without a funeral director.

Fatteh, Abdullah. At Journey’s End: A Complete Guide To Funerals And Funeral Planning. Health Information Press, 1999. An invaluable guide, reference and resource for planning one’s own funeral and/or the funeral of a loved one.

Kerr, Margaret. Facing a Death in the Family: Caring for Someone Through Illness and Dying, Arranging the Funeral, Dealing with the Will and Estate. John Wiley & Sons. 1999. An easy-to-understand guide to the difficult task of caring for ailing loved ones.

Lynch, Thomas. The Undertaking: Life Studies From the Dismal Trade. Penguin USA. 1998. Ostensibly about death and its attendant rituals. The Undertaking is in the end about life. In each case Mr. Lynch writes, it is the one that gives meaning to the other. Mr. Lynch is a poet, an author and a funeral director in Milford, Michigan.

Lynch, Thomas. Bodies in Motion and at Rest: On Metaphor and Mortality. W.W. Norton & Company. 2000. A collection of essays in search of the meaning of our lives and times, between birth and death.

Martin, Sheila. Saying Goodbye with Love: A Step-by-Step Guide Through the Details of Death. Crossroad Publishing Co. 1999. A handbook for overcoming the challenges of the newly bereaved. Includes information on estate planning.

Miller, Clarence. The Funeral Book. Robert D. Reed Publishing. 1994. Gives insider’s advice for saving money and reducing stress while planning a funeral.

Moderow, Karen. The Parting: Celebrate a Life by Planning a Meaningful, Creative Funeral. Jordon West Publications. 1996. Offers encouragement and step-by-step instructions for creating a memorial that will reflect the special life and personality of a loved one.

Polen, Dallas. Funeral Arrangement Choice Guide: A Workbook for Arrangements at the Time of a Death. Servant Publications. 1996. This workbook is a step-by-step guide to asking questions, delegating duties and evaluating funeral options.

Young, Gregory. The High Cost of Dying: A Guide to Funeral Planning. Prometheus Books. 1994. This comprehensive overview of the funeral home business provides valuable inside information needed by thoughtful consumers.